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Displaying 121 to 132 (of 789 pathways)

GAs (Gibberellins) are members of a large family of Diterpenoid compounds, which are essential for a number of processes, including Gene Expression in Cereal Aleurones, Seed Germination, Elongation, Growth, and Flowering. During the last four decades, Barley Aleurone has been a valuable system for studying GA regulation of gene expression. After germination, GAs are released from the Embryo into the Endosperm, triggering the expression of a number of genes encoding Hydrolytic enzymes in Aleurone cells. Many of these Hydrolytic enzymes, which include Alpha-Amylase, Proteases, and Cell Wall–degrading enzymes, are secreted and are responsible for digestion of the stored reserves in the starchy endosperm. The Signal transduction events leading from the Receptor to the[..]

The nuclei of all eukaryotic cells contain three different RNA Polymerases, designated I, II and III. Like the DNA polymerase that catalyzes DNA replication, RNA Polymerases catalyze the formation of the phosphodiester bonds that link the nucleotides together to form a linear chain. The RNA polymerase moves stepwise along the DNA, unwinding the DNA helix just ahead of the active site for polymerization to expose a new region of the template strand for complementary base-pairing. In this way, the growing RNA chain is extended by one nucleotide at a time in the 5’-to-3’ direction. The substrates are nucleoside triphosphates (ATP, CTP, UTP, and GTP); as for DNA replication, a hydrolysis of high-energy bonds provides the energy needed to drive the reaction forward.[..]

The nuclei of all eukaryotic cells contain three different RNA Polymerases, designated I, II and III. Like the DNA Polymerase that catalyzes DNA replication, RNA Polymerases catalyze the formation of the phosphodiester bonds that link the nucleotides together to form a linear chain. Each eukaryotic RNA Polymerase catalyzes transcription of genes encoding different classes of RNA. RNA Polymerase-II catalyzes transcription of all protein-coding genes; that is, it functions in production of mRNAs. RNA Polymerase-II also produces four snRNAs (small nuclear RNAs) that take part in RNA splicing.The eukaryotic polymerases do not directly recognize their core promoter sequences. The first step in complex formation at a promoter containing a TATA Box is binding of the factor[..]

The nuclei of all eukaryotic cells contain three different RNA Polymerases, designated I, II and III. Like the DNA Polymerase that catalyzes DNA replication, RNA Polymerases catalyze the formation of the phosphodiester bonds that link the nucleotides together to form a linear chain. Each eukaryotic RNA Polymerase catalyzes transcription of genes encoding different classes of RNA. Transcription by RNA Polymerase-III produces small, stable RNAs including tRNAs, the 5S rRNA associated with the large ribosomal subunit, one of the snRNA (small nuclear RNAs) required for pre-mRNA splicing, and the 7S RNA associated with the signal recognition particle involved in secretion of proteins and the insertion of membrane-spanning proteins into cellular membranes. The func¬tions of[..]

During the final step in formation of a mature, functional mRNA, the introns are removed and exons are spliced together. The discovery that introns are removed during splicing came from electron microscopy of RNA-DNA hybrids between adenovirus DNA and the mRNA encoding hexon, a major virion capsid protein. For short transcription units, RNA splicing usually follows cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3’ end of the primary transcript. But for long transcription units containing multiple exons, splicing of exons in the nascent RNA usually begins before transcription of the gene is complete (Ref.1 & 2). The splicing snRNPs (Ribonucleoproteins) associate with the pre-mRNA and with each other in an ordered sequence to form the spliceosome. This large ribonucleoprotein[..]

ATP Binding Cassette transporters comprise a large family of membrane-spanning proteins that are responsible for transporting a variety of substrates in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The most intriguing and, arguably, the most important membrane proteins for this purpose are the ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters. These proteins, found in all species, use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to translocate specific substrates across cellular membranes. Many of these transporters are responsible for the translocation of lipophilic substrates such as phospholipids, bile acids, and sterols (Ref.1 & 2).Beta-Sitosterol and other plant sterols are directly transported back to the gut lumen by the heterodimeric ABCG5-ABCG8 complex by means of a sort of kickback mechanism, which[..]

Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin found in all organisms that functions as a cofactor of Biotin-dependent carboxylases. It belongs to the B-Complex group of Vitamins and is an essential micronutrient for all mammals. The role of Biotin (or Vitamin-H) in Carboxylases is to act as vector for carboxyl-group transfer between donor and acceptor molecules during Carboxylation reaction (Ref.1). In M. musculus (Mus musculus), Biotin is a covalently bound as a prosthetic group in Biotin-dependent Carboxylases. It is covalently attached to Carboxylases by the action of Biotin-Protein Ligase. As a co-factor Biotin changes Apocarboxylases into active Holocarboxylases. For Biotin-Protein Ligase, Biotin addition occurs as an ATP-dependent, two-step reaction that, in the first step,[..]

Biotin is a water-soluble Vitamin required by all organisms by virtue of its essential role in carboxylation reactions. Whereas animals lack the ability to synthesize Biotin, it is synthesized by microorganisms and plants and therefore is widespread in the food supply at low concentrations relative to most water-soluble Vitamins (Ref.1). The highest level of Biotin occurs in organ meats such as liver and kidney, but it is low in meats, most vegetables, and fruits. It is also known as Vitamin-H. This member of Vitamin B-Complex group is colorless, withstands high temperatures and is orthorhombic when crystallized. It consists of two fused rings: an Imidazol (Ureido) and a Sulfur-containing (Tetrahydrothiophene) ring; and the latter is extended via a Valeric acid side[..]

Herpesviridae is a large family of viruses including several members that are pathogenic to humans, causing a variety of disorders ranging from cold sores and chicken pox to less frequent conditions such as blindness and cancers. HSV1 (Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1), the prototypical member of this family, is a large DNA-containing neurotropic virus endemic in all human populations. Following an initial infection in epithelial cells, the virus spreads to neurons of sensory ganglia, where it becomes latent. The virus emerges sporadically from latency, causing recurrent mucocutaneous lesions. Reactivation of the latent genomes upon stress can lead to re-infection of the epithelial tissue by anterograde spread or in immunosuppressed patients to life-threatening diseases by[..]

Sterols are a structurally conserved class of lipids that play multifaceted roles in Eukaryotes, serving as essential components of Cell membranes and precursors to Steroid hormones. Characterized by a –OH group on the C3 of the Steroid nucleus, Sterols represent the most abundant type of Steroids in Vertebrates as well as in Plants. In Vertebrates, Cholesterol is by far the major Sterol, whereas a mixture of various Sterols is present in higher plants. The major Sterol is typically Sitosterol, followed by Campesterol, Stigmasterol, and various minor sterols like Isofucosterol, Brassicasterol and Cholesterol. Functional roles for the Campesterol-derived BRs (Brassinosteroids) are established for integrating light signals in the regulation of postembryonic plant[..]

Stmn1 (Stathmin-1) also referred to as Op18 (Oncoprotein-18) is a major regulator of microtubule dynamics. It is an evolutionarily well conserved 17 kDa cytoplasmic phosphoprotein that is highly expressed in a wide variety of cancers and its high abundance seems to be necessary for the maintenance of the transformed phenotypes. Breast cancers exhibit high levels of Stmn1 and may be resistant to anti-microtubule agents. Stmn1 destabilizes microtubule polymers of Alpha and Beta-Tubulin subunits, by promoting catastrophes that ultimately results in deregulation of cell cycle, hampering cell survival (Ref.1). One of the key properties of microtubules is that of ‘dynamic instability’. Dynamic instability comprises the continuous switching between catastrophes[..]

The process by which the body prevents blood loss is referred to as coagulation. Thrombin/TFIIa (Activated Factor-II) is a multifunctional serine proteinase, which serves as an essential component of the process of Blood Coagulation - the hemostatic process of greatest interest. When a blood vessel is injured, bleeding is stopped by clotting (Coagulation) factors that form a thrombus (clot) of Fibrin threads which trap platelet aggregates and other blood cells. Clotting is a mechanism used by the body to stop bleeding. Our body needs to be able to clot blood as this is the normal way bleeding is stopped to begin the healing following an injury. The first step in clotting is adhesion of platelets, which are fragments of blood cells that circulate in the blood, to the[..]

Displaying 121 to 132 (of 789 pathways)
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