• info@proteinlounge.com

Pathways

All Pathways

Displaying 25 to 36 (of 789 pathways)

Nitrosomonas europaea is a gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph that can derive all its energy and reductant for growth from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Nitrosomonas europaea participates in the biogeochemical N cycle in the process of nitrification. It lives in several places such as soil, sewage, freshwater, the walls of buildings and on the surface of monuments especially in polluted areas where air contains high levels of nitrogen compounds. This microbe prefers an optimum pH of 6.0-9.0, fairly neutral conditions, has an aerobic metabolism and prefers a temperature range of 20-30 degrees centigrade. Most are motile with flagella located in the Polar Regions although some species are nonmotile. The cell's demand for carbon has to be met almost[..]

ERK5 (also known as the BMK1 (Big MAP Kinase-1)) is an atypical MAPK that can be activated in vivo by a variety of stimuli, including Serum, Growth factors including EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor), NGF (Nerve Growth Factor) and BDNF (Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor), GPCRs (G-Protein Coupled Receptors), Lysophosphatidic Acid, Neurotrophins and Phorbol ester and some Cellular stress such as Oxidative and Osmotic Shock. MAPK (Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase) cascades play important roles in many cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival and apoptosis. They are also important for many physiological functions in several systems, including in developmental, immune and neuronal systems. At least 12 isoforms of MAPKs exist in mammalian[..]

Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is biologically aggressive neoplasms which have an elevated, often aberrant, proliferative capacity with a diffuse pattern of brain invasion. It is the most malignant Astrocytic tumor, composed of poorly differentiated neoplastic astrocytes. The World Health Organization (WHO) grading system classifies Gliomas into Grades I-IV based on the degree of malignancy, as determined by histopathological criteria. In the Central Nervous System (CNS), Grade-I Gliomas generally behave in a benign fashion and might even be circumscribed, whereas Grade-II, Grade-III and Grade-IV Gliomas are malignant and diffusely infiltrate throughout the brain. Glioblastoma Multiforme falls under the Grade-IV category. Glioblastoma Multiforme or the WHO Grade-IV[..]

ILK(Integrin-linked kinase) is a key scaffold protein that localizes to focal adhesions, acts as a central component of a heterotrimer (the ILK–PINCH–parvin complex). Since its discovery, ILK has been demonstrated to have an essential role in connecting the cytoplasmic tail of β subunits of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton, and in regulating actin polymerization. Within this pivotal position, ILK has been shown to interact with many intracellular proteins through PINCH or parvin to mediate diverse arrays of biological events,or to mediate cell responses induced by the interaction of integrins with the ECM(extracellular matrix)(Ref.1). Several adaptor proteins with Actin binding properties interact with the C-terminus (COOH-terminus) of ILK.[..]

In response to Retinoic Acid (a metabolite of Vitamin-A (all-trans-Retinol), which affects gene transcription), target genes are regulated by two families of nuclear receptors, the RARs (Retinoic Acid Receptors) and the RXRs (Retinoid X Receptors) that bind as RAR/RXR heterodimers to response elements located in their promoters. The all-trans-Retinoic Acid, the Carboxylic Acid form of Vitamin-A is of biological significance since it is predominant under most physiological situations and explains all of the biological effects of Vitamin-A (Ref.1). Biologically active ligands for the RARs include all-trans-Retinoic Acid, 9-cis-Retinoic Acid among others, yet circulating levels of 9-cis-Retinoic Acid are much lower than those of all-trans-Retinoic Acid and the[..]

Influenza, commonly called "the flu", is an infection of the respiratory tract caused by the Influenza virus. Compared with most other viral respiratory infections, such as the common cold, Influenza infection often causes a more severe illness. Typical Influenza illness includes fever and respiratory symptoms, such as cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, as well as headache, muscle aches, and often extreme fatigue. Although nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea can sometimes accompany Influenza infection, especially in children, these symptoms are rarely the primary symptoms. Most people who get the flu recover completely in 1 to 2 weeks, but some people develop serious and potentially life-threatening medical complications, such as pneumonia. In an average year,[..]

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease characterized by high blood glucose levels that requires long-term medical attention both to limit the development of its devastating complications and to manage them when they do occur. The pancreatic Beta-cell and its secretory product insulin are central in the pathophysiology of diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes, Type-I, which is insulin dependent, and Type-II, which is non-insulin dependent. Type-II diabetes is a complex and heterogeneous disease caused by both environmental and genetic factors. It maybe of various forms each of which is characterized by variable degrees of insulin resistance and Beta-cell dysfunction, and which together lead to hyperglycemia. At each end of this spectrum are single gene[..]

Poliovirus is a member of the Picornaviridae family, which includes a number of significant pathogens of humans (e.g., Rhinoviruses, Coxsackieviruses, Echoviruses, Enteroviruses, and Hepatitis-A virus) and livestock (e.g., foot-and-mouth disease viruses). Poliovirus has three known serotypes: PV1, PV2, and PV3 and all three serotypes can cause poliomyelitis, a paralytic disease resulting from the destruction of motor neurons in the CNS (Central Nervous System). All the three serotypes of Poliovirus recognize a common cellular receptor, CD155 (or PVR, Poliovirus Receptor), for cell attachment and entry. CD155 is a transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily. The ectodomain of CD155 mediates cell attachment to the ECM (Extracellular Matrix)[..]

Poxviruses (of the family Poxviridae) are a family of the largest and most complex viruses that infect humans. They are large brick-shaped or ovoid complex dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) viruses capable of replicating in the cell cytoplasm independent of the cell nucleus and have in common the propensity to produce cutaneous lesions. Variola virus is the most virulent member of the Orthopox genus of viruses causing smallpox. It is specific for humans and has no other animal hosts. The primary reason for infection in humans is due to its ability to evade the host immune responses, and avoid complement activation. The prototype Orthopoxvirus, Vaccinia shows considerable sequence similarity to Variola and is the current smallpox vaccine. Other Orthopoxviruses such as cowpox[..]

HBV(Hepatitis B virus) is a member of the family Hepadnaviridae. It is a hepatotropic non-cytopathic DNA virus and is a major cause of acute and chronic hepatitis in humans. As HBV itself is currently viewed as a non-cytopathic virus, the liver pathology associated with hepatitis B is mainly thought to be due to immune responses directed against HBV antigens. The outcome of HBV infection is the result of complex interactions between replicating HBV and the immune system.Both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system are generally involved in responding to the viral infection, with innate responses being important for control of viral replication and dissemination very early after infection, as well as for timely orchestration of virus-specific adaptive responses.[..]

HBV (Hepatitis-B Virus) belongs to a family of closely related DNA viruses called the Hepadnaviruses. Included in this family are the WHV (Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus), the DHBV (Duck Hepatitis-B Virus) and several other avian and mammalian variants. Hepadnaviruses have a strong preference for infecting liver cells, but small amounts of hepadnaviral DNA can be found in kidney, pancreas, and mononuclear cells. However, infection at these sites is not linked to extra hepatic disease (Ref.1). The HBV nucleocapsid contains a relatively small and partially duplex 3.2 Kb circular DNA, viral polymerase and core protein. The genome has only four long open reading frames. The preS–S (presurface–surface) region of the genome encodes the three viral surface antigens by[..]

A cell must selectively translocate molecules across its plasma membrane to maintain the chemical composition of its cytoplasm distinct from that of the surrounding milieu. The most intriguing and, arguably, the most important membrane proteins for this purpose are the ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters. These proteins, found in all species, use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to translocate specific substrates across cellular membranes. The chemical nature of the substrates handled by ABC transporters is extremely diverse--from inorganic ions to sugars and large polypeptides--yet ABC transporters are highly conserved (Ref.1).Transporters have been classified as primary, secondary, or tertiary active transporters. Secondary or tertiary active transporters, such as[..]

Displaying 25 to 36 (of 789 pathways)
logo

 

9853 Pacific Heights Blvd.
Suite D., San Diego, CA 92121, USA

Tel: 858-224-2869
Fax: 858-205-1192
info@proteinlounge.com

Institutional License

Need our databases and tools to be availed by your whole university or institute? We recommend signing up for our Site License.

To set up a license, please contact: info@proteinlounge.com

Copyright © Protein Lounge Inc.